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  #21  
Old 02-20-2018, 03:05 PM
Svenska Svenska is offline
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What Tica said, exactly. With time and practice, some of us really are that good.

Excelling at acrostics is a lot like excelling at the New York Times Sunday crossword puzzles. There's a "language" to learn, if you will, and just like any other language, the longer you practice the more quickly you will begin to recognize patterns and thereby become more proficient.

It's that simple. There is no cheating involved. There's no alchemy or complicated algorithms involved, either. I suggest you focus on improving your own skills rather than concerning yourself with what others are doing. Perhaps one day, you too will get so good that others accuse you of cheating.
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  #22  
Old 02-21-2018, 07:45 PM
leosammy21 leosammy21 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Svenska View Post
What Tica said, exactly. With time and practice, some of us really are that good.

Excelling at acrostics is a lot like excelling at the New York Times Sunday crossword puzzles. There's a "language" to learn, if you will, and just like any other language, the longer you practice the more quickly you will begin to recognize patterns and thereby become more proficient.

It's that simple. There is no cheating involved. There's no alchemy or complicated algorithms involved, either. I suggest you focus on improving your own skills rather than concerning yourself with what others are doing. Perhaps one day, you too will get so good that others accuse you of cheating.
I, too, have wondered how a player can be so fast at these puzzles. However, instead of instantly jumping to "they must be cheating", I thought to myself "Wow, they must be a lot better at this than I am". And.....I started practicing......and practicing.....and practicing. I have yet to beat a "low score", but I will someday. And I hope I don't get accused of cheating when I do.
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  #23  
Old 03-08-2018, 06:29 AM
bfloxword bfloxword is offline
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Default you quick solvers...show us the proof

It does not take a pHD to know that a person cannot solve a puzzle like this in the amount of time it takes to quickly type in the total answer. It is obvious to everyone that there is a secret method to pausing the puzzle, figuring it out, and then, quickly typing in the solution. I am a pretty good puzzler and I sometimes can go through the clues and solve almost every one of them, then look at the grid and fill in the blanks. The result? a time that is often about twice the time it took the quickest solver.

In fact, to improve my scores overall, I click on the 'play' button until I see a low time score of less than 100. Such score simply means, to me, that the puzzle is relatively short, less than 80 or 90 blanks. It was a puzzle that the answer, already known, could just be typed in within the record time posted.

I do not believe, for a moment, that there are super-brained people who can look at a grid and type in the quotation. The records cannot be explained in any other way.
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  #24  
Old 03-08-2018, 10:52 AM
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Tica Tica is online now
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I don't think anyone types in the puzzle itself. I type in the clues. There are times when I can finish typing the answer to one clue while I am reading the next. If I go through the clues quickly, then filling in the few remaining letters is relatively fast. I don't break records often, but that's usually how it happens when I do.

And if people do cheat (which I highly doubt), it doesn't stop me from challenging myself.
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  #25  
Old 03-08-2018, 01:33 PM
StringBender StringBender is offline
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Agreed!!
I worked several 11-clue puzzles this morning and while I'm never going to break any records, it occurred to me that in many of them, the record time was anywhere from 37 to 110 seconds.That works out to 3.3 seconds per clue on the short side, to about 10 seconds for the longer ones. I'm never going to be convinced that anyone can possibly read, understand, process, solve and then type any clue in under 4 seconds much less do it repeatedly.
Until someone posts a valid video of themselves doing it on YouTube or someplace where we can see this miraculous feat performed, I'm just not buying it. THEY HAVE A HACK! We know it. They know it. And they know we know it
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  #26  
Old 05-22-2018, 02:42 AM
Jimmy Jimmy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tica View Post
I appreciate the way you replied to Jimmy. I thought about replying, but would probably not have been so nice about it. I definitely learned more from you than from Jimmy.
Wasn’t trying to teach you anything, so what you “learned” is not the issue.

The issue is that these record times stretch the boundaries of credibility.
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  #27  
Old 05-26-2018, 01:46 PM
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Tica Tica is online now
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No one ran a mile in under 4 minutes until someone (Roger Bannister) did. Now the record is 3:43.13. Boundaries are stretched every day. Hope you enjoy this site as much as I do.
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  #28  
Old 06-14-2018, 03:04 PM
Jimmy Jimmy is offline
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The problem is that these guys are running a 1-minute mile.
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  #29  
Old 06-17-2018, 08:36 AM
criv227 criv227 is offline
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Default Yeah, but it's pretty suspicious....

The high scores are definitely possible, with the practice and skill mentioned.

HOWEVER...
I once got a high score in a puzzle (after a lot of time spent practicing). I was incredibly proud of myself and kept refreshing the main page to see my high score listed. Then, within 1 hour of my high score, someone beat it. That seemed... suspicious. Puzzles are supposed to be random, and yet within that time one of the top puzzle solvers on the site randomly got to my exact puzzle and beat the score? And it was one of the same people that set most of the high scores.

I don't claim to be the best at this and figured my high score wouldn't last too long, but that was an oddly quick time frame. Like someone was watching for new records then going to that puzzle to beat it.

Right now, if I look at the Records tab, the exact same person has set a record on a puzzle every 10 minutes. Seems sketchy.

(Also, I'm pretty sure I know how to cheat if one wanted to, but I'm not going to post that here. It's one of the most pathetic things you can do to want to cheat on a friendly online puzzle site, for Pete's sake!!!)
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  #30  
Old 06-27-2018, 12:05 PM
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ritzyrita ritzyrita is offline
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Default Short puzzles with high average scores and very high record scores

I have noticed that very short puzzles, which are difficult because they have high average scores, have amazingly fast record scores. I guess they take less time to type.
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